Connecting Communities Across the Americas

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The migration of shorebirds across the globe is one of nature's greatest events and a reminder of our shared responsibility.

What's New?

First Science Summit! Point Blue hosted a Migratory Shorebird Project Science Summit, October 18-20, 2016 in Petaluma, California. Seventeen individuals representing 13 institutions and 6 countries participated for the full 3-day Summit and an additional 12 people attended our climate change focused session on the first day. By the end of the Summit, we had advanced Migratory Shorebird Project science towards publication and identified pathways to communicate findings internationally to promote application to flyway conservation. Check back soon for the full report. (group photo at Point Blue headquarters in Petaluma, CA at right)

Survey Season Complete! The 2016-17 survey season has been completed: we recorded over 2 million shorebirds across 12 countries between November 2016 and February 2017.

Panama 2016 Workshop Summary now available!

Become Part of the Migratory Shorebird Project

Join this ambitious 10-year, multi-partner research project to help guide shorebird conservation. You will be part of the team protecting shorebirds and wetlands from Alaska to Peru through research for conservation.
We need your help, as a scientist, a volunteer scientist, an educator, or funder.

 

How to Get Involved

  • Add your organization to the list of partners.
  • Join forces with a local partner.
  • Volunteer to study shorebirds, attend a training.
  • Share information, sightings, research findings.
  • Educate people about wetland conservation.

The Migration Phenomenon

Each year, millions of shorebirds migrate in waves from their wintering grounds along the Pacific and Caribbean coasts to their nesting grounds in Alaska and Northern Canada, stopping at just a few rich feeding spots along the way. (Willets and Marbled Godwits pictured above)

   
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